Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/93618
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Type: Journal article
Title: Effects of an antenatal dietary intervention on maternal anthropometric measures in pregnant women with obesity
Author: Dodd, J.
Kannieappan, L.
Grivell, R.
Deussen, A.
Moran, L.
Yelland, L.
Owens, J.
Citation: Obesity, 2015; 23(8):1555-1562
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 1930-739X
1930-739X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jodie M. Dodd, Lavern M. Kannieappan, Rosalie M. Grivell, Andrea R. Deussen, Lisa J. Moran, Lisa N. Yelland, and Julie A. Owens
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The effect of providing antenatal dietary and lifestyle advice on secondary measures of maternal anthropometry was evaluated and their correlation with both gestational weight gain and infant birth weight was assessed. METHODS: In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial, pregnant women with BMI of ≥25 kg/m(2) received either Lifestyle Advice or Standard Care. Maternal anthropometric outcomes included arm circumference, biceps, triceps, and subscapular skinfold thickness measurements (SFTM), percentage body fat (BF), gestational weight gain, and infant birth weight. The intention to treat principles were utilized by the analyses. RESULTS: The measurements were obtained from 807 (74.7%) women in the Lifestyle Advice Group and 775 (72.3%) women in the Standard Care Group. There were no statistically significant differences identified between the treatment groups with regards to arm circumference, biceps, triceps, and subscapular SFTM, or percentage BF at 36-week gestation. Maternal anthropometric measurements were not significantly correlated with either gestational weight gain or infant birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: Among pregnant women with a BMI of ≥25 kg/m(2) , maternal SFTM were not modified by an antenatal dietary and lifestyle intervention. Furthermore, maternal SFTM correlate poorly with both gestational weight gain and infant birth weight.
Keywords: Humans; Pregnancy Complications; Obesity; Birth Weight; Weight Gain; Anthropometry; Treatment Outcome; Perinatal Care; Diet; Feeding Behavior; Pregnancy; Adult; Infant, Newborn; South Australia; Female
Rights: © 2015 The Obesity Society
RMID: 0030031661
DOI: 10.1002/oby.21145
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/519240
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/627005
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1073514
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1052388
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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