Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99239
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Type: Journal article
Title: Gas to liquids: natural gas conversion to aromatic fuels and chemicals in a hydrogen-permeable ceramic hollow fiber membrane reactor
Author: Xue, J.
Chen, Y.
Wei, Y.
Feldhoff, A.
Wang, H.
Caro, J.
Citation: ACS Catalysis, 2016; 6(4):2448-2451
Publisher: ACS
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 2155-5435
2155-5435
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jian Xue, Yan Chen, Yanying Wei, Armin Feldhoff, Haihui Wang, and Juergen Caro
Abstract: The performance of a dense ceramic hydrogen-permeable membrane reactor for the nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA), according to the equilibrium reaction 6CH₄ ⇆ C₆H₆+ 9H₂ with a 6 wt % Mo/HZSM-5 bifunctional catalyst was investigated. A U-shaped ceramic hollow fiber membrane of the composition La₅.₅Wₒ.₆Mo₀.₄O₁₁.₂₅−δ (LWM₀.₄) has been used for the in situ removal of H₂ to overcome thermodynamic constraints. The yield of aromatics (benzene, toluene, naphthalene) in the MDA could be increased in the beginning of the aromatization reaction by ∼50%–70%, in comparison with the fixed-bed reactor, because 40%–60% of the H₂ abstracted have been extracted at 700 °C with a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 840 cm³ gcat¯¹ h¯¹. These advantages of the membrane reactor operation decrease with time on stream, since the removal of H₂ boosts not only CH₄ conversion and yield of aromatics, but also catalyst deactivation by deposition of carbonaceous deposits. However, the catalyst system could be regenerated by burning the coke away with air.
Keywords: natural gas conversion; nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization; hydrogen-permeable ceramic membrane; hollow fiber membrane; gas-to-liquids technologies; catalyst regeneration
Rights: © 2016 American Chemical Society
RMID: 0030047261
DOI: 10.1021/acscatal.6b00004
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT140100757
Appears in Collections:Chemical Engineering publications

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