Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/9970
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Type: Journal article
Title: Long-term survival of children with end-stage renal disease
Author: McDonald, S.
Craig, J.
Citation: New England Journal of Medicine, 2004; 350(26):2654-2662
Publisher: Massachusetts Medical Soc
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0028-4793
1533-4406
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Stephen P. McDonald, and Jonathan C. Craig
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Although renal-replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease has been used for several decades, data on patients' long-term survival are sparse. METHODS: We examined the long-term survival of all children and adolescents who were under 20 years of age when renal-replacement therapy commenced (study period, April 1963 through March 2002), using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry. Survival was analyzed with the use of Kaplan-Meier methods and age-standardized mortality rates. Risk factors for death were analyzed with the use of Cox regression analysis with time-dependent covariates. RESULTS: A total of 1634 children and adolescents were followed for a median of 9.7 years. The long-term survival rate among children requiring renal-replacement therapy was 79 percent at 10 years and 66 percent at 20 years. Mortality rates were 30 times as high as for children without end-stage renal disease. Risk factors for death were a young age at the time renal-replacement therapy was initiated (especially for children under 1 year of age, among whom the risk was four times as high as for children 15 to 19 years of age) and treatment with dialysis (which was associated with a risk more than four times as high as for renal transplantation). Overall, a trend toward improved survival was observed over the four decades of the study. CONCLUSIONS: Despite improvement in long-term survival, mortality rates among children requiring renal-replacement therapy remain substantially higher than those among children without end-stage renal disease. Increasing the proportion of children treated with renal transplantation rather than with dialysis can improve survival further.
Keywords: Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Nephrology Association; Humans; Kidney Failure, Chronic; Renal Replacement Therapy; Cause of Death; Survival Rate; Multivariate Analysis; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; Cohort Studies; Age Factors; Adolescent; Adult; Child; Child, Preschool; Infant; Survivors; Australia; New Zealand; Female; Male
RMID: 0020040541
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa031643
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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