Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99955
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Type: Journal article
Title: Exploring psychological wellbeing in a sample of Australian actors
Author: Robb, A.
Due, C.
Venning, A.
Citation: Australian Psychologist, 2018; 53(1):77-86
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1742-9544
1742-9544
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Alison E Robb, Clemence Due, and Anthony Venning
Abstract: Objective: The objective of the current study was to explore what factors might impact the psychological wellbeing of adult, Australian professional actors. Method: Twenty South Australian actors were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. Ten were male and 10 female, ranging in age from 22 to 66 years old, with self-reported professional experience ranging from 1 to 50 years. The participants were interviewed in-depth about their experiences of being an actor, with a particular focus on wellbeing, and the data were analysed using thematic analysis, with numerous checks in place for methodological rigour. Results: Two broad categories of themes were established; environmental and personal factors. Environmental factors included power, lifestyle, fringe-dwelling, engagement, the tribe, and taking care of yourself. Personal factors included pursuit, strengths, the calling, precariousness and looking within. Conclusions: Themes were considered in terms of contemporary wellbeing theory, along with clinical implications relating to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM5). Findings included: actors experience a range of threats to wellbeing, such as problems with autonomy, lack of environmental mastery, complex interpersonal relationships and high self-criticism. Factors facilitating wellbeing include ongoing personal growth and a sense of purpose. The findings also suggest that actors are vulnerable to depression, generalised anxiety symptoms, vicarious trauma, and perfectionism.
Keywords: Actors; mental health; performing arts; qualitative; wellbeing
Rights: © 2016 The Australian Psychological Society
RMID: 0030050021
DOI: 10.1111/ap.12221
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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