Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112099
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Type: Journal article
Title: The emerging complexity of γδT17 cells
Other Titles: The emerging complexity of gamma deltaT17 cells
Author: McKenzie, D.
Comerford, I.
Silva-Santos, B.
McColl, S.
Citation: Frontiers in Immunology, 2018; 9(APR):796-1-796-13
Publisher: Frontiers Media
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1664-3224
1664-3224
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Duncan R. McKenzie, Iain Comerford, Bruno Silva-Santos and Shaun R. McColl
Abstract: Preprogrammed IL-17-producing γδ T cells constitute a poorly understood class of lymphocytes that express rearranged antigen receptors but appear to make little use of them. γδT17 cells were first characterized as tissue-resident sentinels with innate effector function. However, ongoing research continues to reveal unexpected complexity to this unusual subset, including phenotypic plasticity, memory-like activity and unique migratory behavior. Despite these advances, at the core of γδT17 cell biology remain fundamental gaps in knowledge: Are γδT17 cells truly innate or has the importance of the T cell receptor been overlooked? How unique are they among IL-17-producing lymphocytes? How similar are these cells between mice and humans? We speculate that answering these unresolved questions is key to successful manipulation of γδ T cells in clinical settings.
Keywords: γδ T cells; IL-17; T cell receptor signaling; migration; plasticity; immunological memory; translation
Description: Published: 20 April 2018
Rights: Copyright © 2018 McKenzie, Comerford, Silva-Santos and McColl. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
RMID: 0030086610
DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.00796
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1066781
Appears in Collections:Molecular and Biomedical Science publications

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